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Books / Book Chapters

Formation of the Solar System Restricted Resource
Analysis of the orbital motion of the Earth, the Moon and other planets and their satellites led to the discovery that all bodies in the Solar System are moving with the first cosmic velocity of their proto parents. The mean orbital velocity of each planet is equal to the first cosmic velocity of the Protosun, the radius of which is equal to the semi-major axis of the planet’s orbit. The same applies for the planets’ satellites.  All the small planets, comets, other bodies and the Sun itself follow this law, a finding that has also been proven by astronomical observations. The theoretical solutions based on the Jacobi dynamics explain the process of the system creation and decay, as well as the nature of Kepler’s laws.
note: Authors:  V.I. Ferronsky, S.V. Ferronsky
ISBN: 978-94-007-5907-7 (Print) 978-94-007-5908-4 (Online)
Springer Link
Giant Planets of Our Solar System Restricted Resource
This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined.
This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.
note: SpringerLink
The solar system
Print Location: SCIENCE Library : QB501 S684s 2013
Author     Seeds, Michael A
Title     The Solar System / Michael A. Seeds
Imprint     Belmont, CA : Thomson Brooks/Cole, c2013
Edition     8th ed
Descript     xiii, 658 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 28 cm
Note     Includes index
Subject     Solar system -- Textbooks
ISBN     9781133363958
Viewing and Imaging the Solar System Restricted Resource
This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined.
This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.
note: Authors: Irwin, Patrick
Springer Book

Encyclopedias

Encyclopedia of the Solar System Restricted Resource Some full text available
Encyclopedia of the Solar System
The Encyclopedia of the Solar System, third edition includes fifty-seven chapters from over seventy five eminent authors who review fundamental topics as well as new models, theories, and discussions, making this the definitive solar system reference.
note: Elsevier Science & Technology

Images

Solar System : Picture

note: From : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Planets2013.jpg

Directories

Solar System : Dictionary

The Solar System comprises the Sun and the objects that orbit it, either directly or indirectly. Of those objects that orbit the Sun directly, the largest eight are the planets that form the planetary system around it, while the remainder are significantly smaller objects, such as dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies such as comets andasteroids.

The Solar System formed 4.6 billion years ago from the gravitational collapse of a giant interstellar molecular cloud. The vast majority of the system's mass is in the Sun, with most of the remaining mass contained in Jupiter. The four smaller inner planets, MercuryVenusEarth and Mars, are terrestrial planets, being primarily composed of rock and metal. The four outer planets are giant planets, being substantially more massive than the terrestrials. The two largest, Jupiter and Saturn, are gas giants, being composed mainly of hydrogen and helium; the two outermost planets, Uranus and Neptune, are ice giants, being composed largely of substances with relatively high melting points compared with hydrogen and helium, called ices, such as water, ammonia and methane. All planets have almost circular orbits that lie within a nearly flat disc called the ecliptic.

The Solar System also contains smaller objects. The asteroid belt, which lies between Mars and Jupiter, mostly contains objects composed, like the terrestrial planets, of rock and metal. Beyond Neptune's orbit lie the Kuiper beltand scattered disc, populations of trans-Neptunian objects composed mostly of ices, and beyond them a newly discovered population of sednoids. Within these populations are several dozen to possibly tens of thousands of objects large enough to have been rounded by their own gravity. Such objects are categorized as dwarf planets. Identified dwarf planets include the asteroid Ceres and the trans-Neptunian objects Pluto and Eris. In addition to these two regions, various other small-body populations, including cometscentaurs and interplanetary dust, freely travel between regions. Six of the planets, at least three of the dwarf planets, and many of the smaller bodies are orbited by natural satellites, usually termed "moons" after Earth's Moon. Each of the outer planets is encircled byplanetary rings of dust and other small objects.

The solar windplasma flowing outwards from the Sun, creates a bubble in the interstellar medium known as theheliosphere. The heliopause is the point at which pressure from the solar wind is equal to the opposing pressure ofinterstellar wind; it extends out to the edge of the scattered disc. The Oort cloud, which is believed to be the source for long-period comets, may also exist at a distance roughly a thousand times further than the heliosphere. The Solar System is located in the Orion Arm, 26,000 light-years from the center of the Milky Way.